5.10.21
4 min. read

$1B in health tech funding. Elon Musk trivia.

Issue 027

Welcome back to E&O Mondays, the free newsletter from Exits & Outcomes that features the world’s most complete weekly health tech funding round-up.

 E&O Mondays.

In this issue:

  • This past week’s round-up includes another $1 billion in health tech funding.
  • Plus: A new Elon Musk-themed trivia question.
  • Finally, if you’re new to E&O Mondays, this free newsletter isn’t much like the ones I send Fridays and every other Wednesday (or the long-form research reports). Yea, yea, it’s great and all, but you’re really missing out if you only read this funding list each week. So, consider becoming a full-fledged subscriber of E&O by clicking right here…

Yet another $1B health tech funding week.

Here’s what I found for health tech funding this past week.

Incredibly, it was another week of $1 billion in funding deals. If you see a * in front of the funding news below, that means E&O reported first. (It also means the company may end up announcing a larger amount of money once the round closed and the funding is official.)

Like last week, I simplified this list to remove funding verb-choice bias. If you’re missing the full sentence structure, however, please assume that most of these companies “squirreled away” their latest round of funding, (but also know that I strongly believe one of them “scrounged up” their funding). Also, this week as an experiment I used the description of the company from their official Twitter bio (minus hashtags). The results were mixed:

$280 million – Collective Health – Series F. Lead: HCSC. “Combining technology and the human touch to improve healthcare for employers and their people.” Release

$110 million – Vida Health – Series D. Lead: General Atlantic. “Vida pairs you with your own health coach and program. It’s like having your own personal trainer, nutritionist and therapist all-in-one, always by your side.” Release

$100 million – Oura – Series C. Leads: Chernin Group and Elysian Park (The Dodgers). “Better lives through better sleep.” TechCrunch

$80 million – Florence – Series C. Lead: Insight Partners. “Advancing and accelerating clinical research through software.” Release

$80 million – Halodoc – Series C. Lead: PT Astra International. Translated Twitter bio from the original Indonesian: “Chat doctor, buy medicine, make an appointment, access 24 hours.” MobiHealthNews

$75 million – Kaia Health – Series C. Lead: Undisclosed PE growth equity fund. “A leading digital therapeutics company that develops AI-powered, evidence-based treatments for conditions like musculoskeletal pain & COPD.” And, also — I missed this one in last week’s newsletter somehow. It was on my list, but didn’t make it into the newsletter. TechCrunch

$60 million – Vim – Series B. Lead: Walgreens. “The easiest way for payers to connect to providers.” Release

$53 million – ZOE – Series C. Lead: Ahren Innovation Capital. “Understand how your body responds to food so you can take back control of your health and weight.” Release

$45 million – Vori Health – Series A. Lead: NEA. “Healthcare startup focused on improving muscle and joint care through integrated virtual-first care.” Release

$20 million – Heartbeat Health – Series B. Lead: Echo Health Ventures. “We’re on a mission to deliver the most effective, efficient, and engaging heart care in the world.” Release

$8 million – Elucid – Series A. Lead: MedTex Ventures and Global Health Impact Fund. “Elucid is improving the way cardiovascular disease is diagnosed & treated by applying machine learning to image analysis with ElucidVivo.” Release

$6.6 million – ifeel – Series A. Lead: Nauta Capital. Translated from the original Spanish bio: “A safe space where you can share your emotions with professional therapists. Because your emotional well-being matters.” TechCrunch

$5.4 million – Expressable – Series: Seed. Lead: Lerer Hippeau and NextView Ventures. “Expressable offers online speech therapy with the industry’s best professionals – and for significantly less money than traditional therapy.” TechCrunch

$4.2 million – Little Otter – Series: Pre-seed and seed. Lead: Torch Capital. No Twitter account, so this is from their site: “Little Otter is the only family-first mental health service designed just for children. Connect with trusted providers from your device and get support for your big and little worries in minutes, not months.” Forbes (paywalled)

* $4.1 million (options and equity) – DeltaTrainer – No Twitter, from their site: “Your trainer provides workout, motivation, and nutrition support via unlimited video calls and messaging.” Site

* $2.5 million – ThrivePass – “Wellness, simplified. Providing customizable solutions to corporate wellness programs.” Site

* $2.5 million – Beam Health – Ah, another “leading” qualifier in a Twitter bio: “Healthcare’s Leading Digital Operations Platform.” Site

* $2 million – ADHD Online – “Our platform offers a certified ADHD assessment from our network of doctorate-level psychologists, and treatment from board-certified physicians where available.” Site

* $1.6 million – Inspiren – No Twitter bio but it makes a device, called AUGi, that is mounted in the patient’s room in the hospital to automatically capture conversations with the care team. Site

* $1.5 million – Predictive Fitness – No Twitter bio but the company’s site explains that it “uses big data and advanced analytics to transform individuals’ fitness data, biometrics, and genetics into highly accurate and actionable intelligence used to power applications for athletes, device manufacturers, and race producers.” Site

* $300,000 – Sniffle Health – “Sniffle connects doctors and patients via our secure mobile app to diagnose non-emergency symptoms to improve convenience, efficiency, and access in healthcare.” Site

Health Tech Trivia Question

Last week’s trivia question was the first one submitted by an E&O subscriber.

Rules: Don’t use Google. Just guess. Hit reply and email me your answer along with whether you want me to include your name/company, just your initials, or keep it anonymous. I’ll provide the answer next Monday along with the first three (3) people to get it right — if anyone does! I’m happy to link out to your company’s website too, which might be worth a lot in SEO mojo someday, who knows?

Question: In the mid-90s before he started his first startup Zip2, Elon Musk and his brother Kimbal worked on a concept for what we would call a digital health company today. Obviously, they didn’t pursue the idea, but they spent some time developing it. In a few words, explain the concept for the Musk brothers’ 1994 digital health idea. If it’s easier, what is the name of a current digital health company that is similar to what the Musk brothers considered building?

Hints: This was revealed in Ashlee Vance’s biography of Musk from 2015. When the book came out, I read it and had my team at MobiHealthNews write this piece of trivia up. So, you may have read about it in Mobi back in the day…

Hit reply if you know…

That’s a wrap on E&O Mondays 027. Why not forward this to a friend?
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5.07.21
6 min. read

Still more DTx CPT codes. Science 37: $24M 2020 revs

Issue 100

Welcome back to E&O Fridays, a paying subscribers-only weekly newsletter focused on the world of digital pharma products and FDA-regulated digital health. And, wow, I can't believe it: Today's issue marks the 100th edition of this weekly!

Paying Subscribers Only

It's a good one, too.
This digital health research is for paying Exits & Outcomes subscribers only. Subscribe now to read this article, get the weekly newsletter, and receive unrestricted access to past and future research from the Exits & Outcomes archives. Smash the link above or below to subscribe yourself -- or head over to our pricing page to subscribe your team or your whole company!
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5.05.21
6 min. read

Amazon mulls more Crossover clinics. eBay’s health stack.

Issue 012

Welcome back to E&O Wednesdays, the enrollment-focused digital health newsletter from Exits & Outcomes -- for paying subscribers only. This every-other-Wednesday issue digs into digital health companies that sell to self-insured employers

Paying Subscribers Only

It's a good one, too.
This digital health research is for paying Exits & Outcomes subscribers only. Subscribe now to read this article, get the weekly newsletter, and receive unrestricted access to past and future research from the Exits & Outcomes archives. Smash the link above or below to subscribe yourself -- or head over to our pricing page to subscribe your team or your whole company!
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5.03.21
4 min. read

$1B in health tech funding. Trivia answer.

Issue 026

Welcome back to E&O Mondays, the free newsletter from Exits & Outcomes that features the world’s most complete weekly health tech funding round-up.

 E&O Mondays.

In this issue:

  • This past week’s round-up of nearly $1 billion in health tech funding.
  • The answer to last week’s trivia question (along with the names of a number of E&O readers who got it right).
  • Finally, if you’re new to E&O Mondays, this free newsletter isn’t much like the ones I send Fridays and every-other-Wednesday (or the long-form research reports). Yea, yea, it’s great and all, but you’re really missing out if you only read this funding list each week. So, consider becoming a full-fledged subscriber of E&O by clicking right here…

Yet another $1B health tech funding week.

Here’s what I found for health tech funding this past week. It looks to be another week of $1 billion in funding deals. But first: Which is your least favorite verb for startup-raises-money news articles? As in: “Startup grabs $5 million in funding from BRB Ventures.” I often see grabs, nabs, earns, lands, and pockets as well as mainstays like raises and, simply, announces.

What keeps me up at night: How do you decide which company “earned” their funding round and which one “grabbed” it? (Like you, I’m pretty sure most writers just choose a verb arbitrarily. But it got me thinking.) So, this week I simplified E&O’s list to remove this verb-choice bias. If you’re missing the full sentence structure, however, please assume that almost all of these companies “dog and pony showed their way” to whatever Series round, (but also know that I strongly believe one of them “glommed onto” their funding).

$316 million – Kry – Series D. Lead: CPP Investments and Fidelity Management & Research. Kry is a virtual care provider operating in Sweden, Norway, and Germany. It also operates in the UK and France as Livi. Release

$300 million – Capsule – Series D. Lead: Durable Capital Partners. Digital pharmacy startup that also expanded into telehealth consultations. Bloomberg

$100 million – Caresyntax – Series C. Lead: PFM Health Sciences. A digital surgery company that analyzes real-world data in and around the OR and offers virtual, real-time consults with remote experts like medical school instructors or medtech reps. Release

$53 million – Ceribell – Series C. Leads: Longitude Capital and The Rise Fund. Developer of a non-invasive brain monitor called Rapid Response EEG for faster diagnosis of seizure. Release

$24 million – Sesame – No lead. Sesame runs a direct-pay healthcare marketplace where patients pay doctors directly for in-person or virtual care. Release

$21 million – Glytec – Debt and equity. Insulin dosing software and glycemic management for in-hospital care. Crunchbase News

$15 million – Seven Bridges – Series C (partial). Big data startup that aims to help researchers “extract meaningful insights from genomic and phenotypic data in order to advance precision medicine.” Release

* $14.2 million – Vessel Health – Wellness tracker and urinalysis startup that monitors nutrition, stress, toxins, and hydration. Site

$13.5 million – Supersapiens – Lead: MICA Ventures. The company self-describes as a sports continuous glucose monitoring startup, which builds software based on Abbott’s CGMs. Supersapiens plans to develop its own wearable. Release

$12.5 million – Vector Remote Care – Series A. Lead: Updata Partners. Digital health startup that helps remote care teams monitor people with implanted cardiac devices. GeekWire

$12 million – Outcomes4Me – Series A. Lead: Northpond Ventures. Helps people with cancer navigate their care journey by combining their personal health information with the company’s datasets. Release

$12 million – Edifice Health – Lead: Leaps by Bayer. Stanford digital health spin-out that uses a novel metric of inflammatory health to develop personalized health interventions starting with nutrition. Release

$12 million – Take Command Health – Series A. Leads: LiveOak Venture Partners and SJF Ventures. Tech-enabled services startup focused on HRA health plans. Release

$10 million – Grin – Seed (extension). Lead: Triventures. Teledental startup focused on teeth straightening. Crunchbase News

$9.5 million – Alife Health – Series A. Lead: Lux Capital. “Fertility technology company building a modern operating system for IVF.” Release

$8 million – The Public Health Company (PHC) – Seed. Investors: Venrock, Verily, Sweat Equity Ventures. The company offers a platform to protect businesses and communities from infectious diseases. Release

* $11.1 million – Form Health – Personalized, medical weight loss with one-on-one coaching via telehealth. Site

$5.5 million – UCM Digital Health – Series A. Lead: Armory Square Ventures. (E&O wrote about this round in mid-March when an SEC filing showed the company had raised $4 million.) Release

$5 million – Calmerry – Seed round. Lead: Digital Future. Online therapy provider. Site

$3.5 million – MD Ally – Seed round. Lead: Generaly Catalyst. Expanding the scope of 911 first responders to provide virtual care in non-emergency concerns. Release

$3 million – CareCar – Seed round. Leads: Kapor Capital and Impact America Fund. The company manages non-emergency medical transportation benefits as well as in-home care benefits. Release

$2.5 million – Votive Health – Lead: Flare Capital Partners. Facilitates payer-provider integration of value-based arrangements for complex care. Release

* $2 million – RxLive – Telehealth pharmacy that connects pharmacists to patients. Site

* $2.1 million – WeRecover. An addiction treatment search engine and digital health assistant named Wendi. Site

* $1.8 million – CyMedica Orthopedics – Debt and other options. Combination of therapy and digital health tech to treat muscles weakened by knee osteoarthritis. Site

$1.65 million – Intus Care – Seed round. Leads: EO Ventures and Third Culture Capital. Helps long-term care facilities predict when their highest-risk patients will need care. Forbes

$1 million – Docosan – Seed round. Lead: AppsWorks. Vietnam-based appointment booking and costs transparency site. VN Express

Health Tech Trivia Answer

Last week’s trivia question was the first one submitted by an E&O subscriber.

ICYMI – The Question: Healtheon is arguably one of the first to claim that digital health and the internet would transform healthcare. Healtheon, founded just over 25 years ago, eventually became a unicorn before that term was even invented. What was Healtheon’s original company name? Bonus follow-up question: Can explain the cause of the company’s name change? Who got it right: Quite a few people! So, I rounded up a few who were among the first to do so… Hats off to these well-studied digital health scholars:

The Answer: Healthscape. The reason for the change — loosely — was that it sounded too much like Netscape. (Surprisingly, it was not because it sounded like “hellscape”.) Both companies were founded by Jim Clark. Others associated with Netscape pushed Clark to change Healthscape’s name, and, thus, it became Healtheon. Healtheon eventually merged into WebMD.

Until next week… (and let me know if you have a trivia question that I can use!)

That’s a wrap on E&O Mondays 026. Why not forward this to a friend?
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4.30.21
6 min. read

Salaries of 76 health tech execs. Clinical trial updates.

Issue 099
Digital health research from Brian Dolan

Welcome back to E&O Fridays, a paying subscribers-only weekly newsletter focused on the world of digital pharma products and FDA-regulated digital

Paying Subscribers Only

It's a good one, too.
This digital health research is for paying Exits & Outcomes subscribers only. Subscribe now to read this article, get the weekly newsletter, and receive unrestricted access to past and future research from the Exits & Outcomes archives. Smash the link above or below to subscribe yourself -- or head over to our pricing page to subscribe your team or your whole company!
×
4.26.21
6 min. read

Almost $2B in health tech funding. Trivia question.

Issue 025
Digital health research from Brian Dolan

Welcome back to E&O Mondays, the free newsletter from Exits & Outcomes that features the world’s most complete weekly health tech funding round-up. This week: Two weeks’ worth of funding.

 E&O Mondays.

In this issue:

  • A giant round-up of nearly $2 billion worth of health tech funding from the past two weeks (and I’m sure I missed a few — there were so many.)
  • Plus: A new trivia question that happens to be the first one submitted by a reader. I’ll reveal the submitter (if he’s willing) along with the correct answers and a few people who get it right –if any — next week).
  • Finally, if you’re new to E&O Mondays, this free newsletter isn’t much like the ones I send out Fridays and every-other-Wednesday (or the long-form research reports). Yea, yea, it’s great and all, but you’re really missing out if you only read this funding list each week. So, consider becoming a full-fledged subscriber of E&O by clicking right here…

Two weeks: Nearly $2B in health tech funding

Here’s what I found for health tech funding these past two weeks. It looks to be approaching $2 billion, which means that slight funding dip I wrote about a few weeks back was just a blip.

France’s health insurance startup Alan raised $220 million led by Coatue with help from new investors Dragoneer and Exor along with existing investors Index Ventures, Ribbit Capital and Temasek. The round valued Alan at $1.67 billion, according to TechCrunch.

App-enabled home gym equipment company Tempo also raised $220 million for its Series C round, which SoftBank Vision Fund 2 led. New backer Steadfast Capital Ventures chipped in along with old friends DCM, General Catalyst, Norwest Venture Partners, and Bling Capital.

Benchling, which builds software for biopharma researchers, raised a $200 million Series E led by Sequoia Capital Global Equities. Altimeter Capital, Byers Capital, and Elad Gil also contributed.

Virta Health, which offers a keto diet-based diabetes management and reversal program, raised a $133 million Series E led by Tiger Global.

CeQur, which has developed a three-day insulin-delivery wearable, raised $115 million in what it is calling its Series C-5 round. Credit Suisse Entrepreneur Capital and Endeavour Vision led along with help from new investors Tandem Diabetes Care and others.

TetraScience, which builds software for biopharma researchers, raised an $80 million Series B led by Insight Partners and Alkeon Capital.

Tesseract Health, a develop of eye-imaging diagnostics, raised an $80 million Series B from Foresite Capital, Glenview Capital, and Opaleye.

Digital clinical trial company Medable raised $78 million led by Sapphire Ventures with help from new backer Obvious Ventures and stalwarts GSR Ventures, PPD Inc. and Streamlined Ventures.

E&O wrote about this company last month when I spotted a $20 million SEC filing, but here’s the full raise: Vesta Healthcare, formerly Hometeam, raised $65 million led by Deerfield Management Company with contributions from a long list of others. The company self-describes as a “technology and clinical services company, dedicated to connecting caregiver insights to the rest of the care team.”

Senior care and companionship startup Papa raised a $60 million Series C led by Tiger Global Management after growing 600 percent year-over-year.

CareRev, an online marketplace for healthcare staffing, raised a $50 million Series A led by Transformation Capital.

Current Health, a remote care management company, raised a $43 million Series B led by Northpond Ventures. Current’s customers include Mount Sinai Health System, Geisinger Health, the UK National Health Service, and AstraZeneca. Current grew its revenue more than 3,000 percent year-over-year.

Proximie, an augmented reality-powered software company focused on digitizing operating rooms, raised a $38 million Series B led by F-Prime Capital.

Cohere Health, which is focused on improving the prior authorization process, raised a $36 million Series B led by Polaris Partners with help from new investors Longitude Capital and Deerfield Management.

Transparent Health Marketplace raised a $30 million Series C led by ARTIS Ventures. THM’s marketplace connects payors to providers via an “open platform featuring market-driven pricing.”

* Remember back in November when virtual autism clinic Sprout Therapy quietly raised $33 million? Well, board member (General Catalyst) Hemant Taneja and Sprout CEO and Co-founder Yury Yakubchyk, Jr. just raised another $30 million without any fanfare.

Recent Mayo Clinic spin-out Anumana raised a $25.7 million Series A led by its co-founders Mayo Clinic and nference along with Matrix Capital Management, Matrix Partners, and NTTVC. “Anumana will use the investment to fund further development and commercialization of AI-enabled ECG and multimodal algorithms for clinical care.”

Oncology clinical informatics company VieCure raised a $25 million Series A led by Northpont Ventures.

1upHealth has raised a $25 million Series B led by F-Prime Capital. The company has built a FHIR-enabled platform “used by dozens of health plans, providers, app developers, and pharma companies.”

Home healthcare equipment and medical devices online store Tomorrow Health raised a $25 million Series A led by Andreessen Horowitz.

Vericred raised a $23 million Series B led by Aquiline Technology Growth. Vericred self-describes as a data services company that powers “digital quote-to-card experiences in health insurance and benefits.”

* Consumer health activation company WellTok quietly raised another $17.4 million.

Medchart raised $17 million across its seed and Series A rounds, which were both led by Crosslink Capital and Golden Ventures. “Medchart lets businesses easily, securely, and cost-effectively access and exchange patient-authorized digital health information for everything from life sciences real-world evidence or insurance underwriting to legal claims.”

Digital therapeutic company Renovia, which is focused on pelvic floor disorders, raised a $17 million Series C.

Predictive algorithms for Chronic Kidney Disease company pulseData raised $16.5 million.

Telemedicine company Ophelia Health, which is focused on opioid use disorder, raised $15 million.

* Health staffing company ConnectRN quietly raised $14.1 million.

* Virtual clinic and health insurance for pets startup Pawp quietly raised $13.3 million.

Seqster raised a $12 million Series A led by OmniHealth Holdings with help from Takeda Digital Ventures and 23andMe CEO and founder Anne Wojcicki. The company self-describes as “a SaaS-based healthcare technology company that enables organizations to drive efficient healthcare via comprehensive medical records (EHR), individual genomic profiles (DNA), and personal health device data.”

Male fertility startup Legacy raised a $10 million Series A led by FirstMark Capital.

De-centralized clinical trials company Lightship quietly raised $10 million in debt, options, and other securities. Site

* Datacubed Health quietly added about another $3 million for its patient-facing app for clinical trial retention and engagement. Site

DignifiHealth, which offers a wide range of digital health services including remote patient monitoring, PBM services, telemedicine, and more, raised a $7 million seed round from undisclosed investors.

Moving Analytics, a telehealth cardiac rehab company, raised a $6 million Series Seed-2 led by Aphelion Capital.

Recent Mayo Clinic spinout Lucem Health raised a $6 million Series A led by founders Mayo Clinic and Commure. “Lucem Health will use the investment to build out its platform for serving AI-generated diagnostic insights to the point of care.”

PyrAmes, a digital continuous blood pressure monitor company, raised a $6 million Series A led by GSR Ventures.

* Prescription delivery startup ScriptDrop quietly raised $5.9 million in debt (promissory note convertible into equity). Site

Aloe Care Health, makers of a voice-activated medical alert system and caregiver support platform, raised $5 million from City Light, Laerdal’s new Million Lives Fund, the Springbank Collective, and Drumbeat Ventures.

SentiAR, which offers augmented reality visualization software for interventional procedures, raised a $5.1 million Series A from new investor TechWald Holding and its existing backers.

* Choosing Therapy, which helps people find a therapist online, quietly raised $5 million. Site

European mental health startup Likeminded, which offers online group therapy meetings, raised $4.2 million from Heartcore Capital and the Hasso Plattner Institute.

Digital therapeutics company 2Morrow, which had an inititial focus on smoking cessation, raised $1.5 million.

OpenLoop, which is a staffing platform that connects providers to telehealth companies, raised $3 million in a seed round led by physician angel investors.

Remote collaboration for surgery support company ExplORer Surgical raised $2.5 million in a round led by Aphelion Capital. Site

Precision birth control and virtual clinic company adyn raised $2.5 million in a round co-led by Lux Capital and M13.

* RxLightning quietly raised $2 million. The company offers providers more than 900 digitized forms: “With our single solution, providers can quickly and easily submit enrollments for patients on any specialty medication to any specialty pharmacy.” Site

German telemedicine company MedKitDoc raised $2 million in a pre-seed round. Site

New and expectant moms subscription-based app Oath Care raised a $2 million seed round from XYZ Venture Capital, General Catalyst, and Muse Capital.

Australia-based, addiction support program Arli raised a $1.9 million seed round led by Folklore Ventures.

* Serenity App, a HIPAA-compliant communication platform that aims to make it easy for seniors to stay in touch with their care team as well as their family, quietly raised $945,000. Site

* Kilter, which allows anyone to set up their own fundraiser by running, biking, walking, etc. quietly raised $733,000. Site

Health Tech Trivia Answer

This week’s trivia question is the first one submitted by an E&O subscriber — pretty sure I was in middle school when this happened…

Rules: Don’t use Google. Just guess. Hit reply and email me your answer along with whether you want me to include your name/company, just your initials, or keep it anonymous. I’ll provide the answer next Monday along with the first three (3) people to get it right — if anyone does! I’m happy to link out to your company’s website too, which might be worth a lot in SEO mojo someday, who knows?

Question: Healtheon is arguably one of the first to claim that digital health and the internet would transform healthcare. Healtheon, founded just over 25 years ago, eventually became a unicorn before that term was even invented. What was Healtheon’s original company name? Bonus follow-up question: Can explain the cause of the company’s name change?

Hit reply if you know…

That’s a wrap on E&O Mondays Issue 025. Help me out: Why not forward it to a friend?
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4.23.21
8 min. read

PlushCare’s pharma deals. Akili picks online pharmacy.

Issue 098
Digital health research from Brian Dolan

Welcome back to E&O Fridays, a paying subscribers-only weekly newsletter focused on the world of digital pharma products and FDA-regulated digital

Paying Subscribers Only

It's a good one, too.
This digital health research is for paying Exits & Outcomes subscribers only. Subscribe now to read this article, get the weekly newsletter, and receive unrestricted access to past and future research from the Exits & Outcomes archives. Smash the link above or below to subscribe yourself -- or head over to our pricing page to subscribe your team or your whole company!
×
22 min. read
4.19.21

The Crossover Health Report

In this article:

In this 5,800-word research report, E&O digs into the past, present, and future of Crossover Health. The report offers up annual revenue figures for the past seven years, customer lists, revenue per clinic calculations, PEPM price point estimates, strategy shifts, and what comes next: (more) Amazon or an IPO?

Crossover Health might be the only health startup that can count Apple as its first customer. And for reasons we will get into below: Its most recent customer, Amazon, could be its last.

Crossover Health's Origin Story

Picking a single event that led to the Crossover Health we know today is difficult because the company was woven from a number of threads that ran in parallel for years beforehand.

Paying Subscribers Only

It's a good one, too.
This digital health research is for paying Exits & Outcomes subscribers only. Subscribe now to read this article, get the weekly newsletter, and receive unrestricted access to past and future research from the Exits & Outcomes archives. Smash the link above or below to subscribe yourself -- or head over to our pricing page to subscribe your team or your whole company!
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3 min. read

Snippet from The Crossover Health Report. Trivia answer.

Issue 024
Digital health research from Brian Dolan

Welcome back to E&O Mondays, the free newsletter from Exits & Outcomes that usually features the world’s most complete weekly health tech funding round-up.

This week: A snippet from E&O’s brand new Crossover Health Report. The family and I are off to the Berkshire mountains for a few days in western Massachusetts. So, this nearly 6,000-word report on Crossover Health will have to hold you over until I get back. E&O Fridays will still hit your inbox at the end of the week.

 E&O Mondays.

In this issue:

  • Instead of a funding round-up, I’m happy to announce the publication of the latest E&O long-form research report for paying subscribers: The Crossover Health Report. (Check out some of Crossover’s customers in the image below…)
  • Plus: An answer to last week’s kind of easy trivia question along with four smart E&O readers who got it right.
  • Finally, if you’re new to E&O Mondays, this free newsletter isn’t much like the ones I send out Fridays and every-other-Wednesday (or the long-form research reports). Yea, yea, it’s great and all, but you’re really missing out if you only read this funding list each week. So, consider becoming a full-fledged subscriber of E&O by clicking right here…

The Crossover Health Report

Crossover Health might be the only health startup that can count Apple as its first customer. And for reasons we will get into later in this report: Its most recent customer, Amazon, could be its last.

Crossover Health’s Origin Story

Picking a single event that led to the Crossover Health we know today is difficult because the company was woven from a number of threads that ran in parallel for years beforehand. I believe Crossover began to take shape the day that Dr. Martin C. Yee sent Dr. Scott Shreeve a direct message on Twitter in 2010…

In this 5,800-word research report, E&O digs into the past, present, and future of Crossover Health. The report offers up annual revenue figures for the past seven years, customer lists (like the one in the image above), revenue per clinic calculations, PEPM price point estimates, strategy shifts, and what comes next: (more) Amazon or an IPO?

Paying subscribers can read the full Crossover Health Report right here.

Health Tech Trivia Answer

Here is the answer to last week’s kind of easy trivia question.

ICYMI Question: Recently STAT reported that Google was once again toying with the idea of developing some kind of consumer-facing medical records tool. Google, of course, famously attempted this in 2008 before announcing plans to shut down the original Google Health personal health record in 2011. At the time of Google Health’s shuttering, what was the name of Google’s Chief Health Strategist? (Hint: He is currently Head of Health Strategy at Facebook.)

Answer: Roni Zieger. (Many people also mention Adam Bosworth who headed up Google Health in its earliest iterations.) While many of you got it right, here are four of the first E&O readers to reply with the correct answer. Hats off to:

Thanks for playing! Back next week with a new one…

That’s a wrap on E&O Mondays Issue 024.
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4.16.21
5 min. read

HHS kills FDA de-reg notice. DTx study updates.

Issue 097
Digital health research from Brian Dolan

Welcome back to E&O Fridays, a paying subscribers-only weekly newsletter focused on the world of digital pharma products and FDA-regulated digital

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It's a good one, too.
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