21 min. read
10.09.20

Five pharma companies talk digital therapeutic partnerships, DTx pricing, and more

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At the recent (virtual, of course) DTx East event, which is typically held in Cambridge, MA, five pharma executives discussed the current state of digital therapeutics. This was probably the best panel at the event and it covered a range of important topics:

  • How far along pharma companies view digital therapeutics
  • Advice for approaching pharma companies for collabs
  • When do pharma companies build vs buy DTx?
  • My favorite: How pharma companies think about pricing for digital therapeutics
  • And more...

Read on for a lightly edited transcript of this panel's conversation, which started with these intros for the five panelists:

Rachel Sha, Vice President, Digital Business Development, Sanofi

We help identify, value, and structure relationships with companies interested in partnering with Sanofi to solve two kinds of problems: One is, how do we do what we do in pharma better, faster, cheaper.

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7 min. read

Pharma execs talk digital therapeutic pricing. Germany reimburses first two prescribable apps.

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This digital health research is for paying Exits & Outcomes subscribers only. Subscribe now to read this article, get the weekly newsletter, and receive unrestricted access to past and future research from the Exits & Outcomes archives. Smash the link above or below to subscribe yourself -- or head over to our pricing page to subscribe your team or your whole company!

Issue 073

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Digital health research from Brian Dolan.

Welcome to E&O.

Last week I wrote about what investors look for in digital therapeutics startups, why Proteus failed (according to its two founders) and more. Here's what's happening this week:

  • Juicy rumor: UnitedHealth is reportedly eyeing an acquisition of Amwell (nee American Well), according to financial services firm Jefferies. The bear case is that Amwell just went public, meaning it likely explored the M&A route already prior to its stock market debut. Still, United/Optum needs to play catch-up with Teladongo.
  • Meanwhile, Livongo is moving into chronic kidney disease care via a big partnership with one of the established CKD companies, Fresenius. E&O readers (and others who analyzed the Teladongo deal closely) have known about Livongo's plans to move into CKD since August.
  • Billionaire Chamath
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14 min. read
10.02.20

Five investors talk digital therapeutics: Red flags, starting up, and COVID–19

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This digital health research is for paying Exits & Outcomes subscribers only. Subscribe now to read this article, get the weekly newsletter, and receive unrestricted access to past and future research from the Exits & Outcomes archives. Smash the link above or below to subscribe yourself -- or head over to our pricing page to subscribe your team or your whole company!

At the virtual DTx East conference in September, five active investors with a focus on digital therapeutics discussed the market. Here are four of the topics they dug into:

  • What they look for in potential investment targets
  • Red flags when evaluating a digital therapeutic startup
  • What startups should look for in investors
  • How COVID--19 has just been a speedbump for some and created tailwinds for others
  • And more...

Here are the panelists and notes from their self-introductions:

Caleb Winder, Managing Director, MemorialCare Innovation Fund

We are focused on investing in healthcare companies across the US in early Series B or later.

Chihiro Hosoya Head of Venture Management & Business Development, Rx+ Business Accelerator Astellas Pharma

Astellas is a pharmaceutical company based in Japan but we operate globally. My scope includes both digital and devices, so we are super interested in

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8 min. read

Proteus founders explain. Investors talk DTx.

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This digital health research is for paying Exits & Outcomes subscribers only. Subscribe now to read this article, get the weekly newsletter, and receive unrestricted access to past and future research from the Exits & Outcomes archives. Smash the link above or below to subscribe yourself -- or head over to our pricing page to subscribe your team or your whole company!

Issue 072.

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Digital health research from Brian Dolan.

Welcome to E&O.

Last week I published The Virgin Pulse Report. Thanks to everyone who sent in feedback. Here's what's happening this week:

  • I am working my way through some long write-ups of the DTx East event, which took place virtually in September. The first of a few quasi-transcripts of discussions at the event is below. I'll aim to do a few more for next week's edition.
  • In the past few weeks, Pear Therapeutics had a few customer announcements. One marked a new type of agreement for the company: The Hartford agreed to offer its employees Pear's reSET and reSET-O prescription digital therapeutics as covered benefits. PreferredOne, a health plan in Minnesota with 364,000 members also added the PDTs to its covered benefits.
  • Cognoa completed its 425-patient pivotal study for the company's "digital autism
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14 min. read
9.25.20

The Virgin Pulse Report

In this article:

In this 3,500-word report, E&O digs into one of the few successful digital health roll-ups: Virgin Pulse. The report includes estimated revenues for the company going back eight years; how much Virgin Pulse was sold for in 2016 and 2018; insights into its acquisition strategy, sales strategy, and more.

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It's a good one, too.
This digital health research is for paying Exits & Outcomes subscribers only. Subscribe now to read this article, get the weekly newsletter, and receive unrestricted access to past and future research from the Exits & Outcomes archives. Smash the link above or below to subscribe yourself -- or head over to our pricing page to subscribe your team or your whole company!

Virgin Pulse was one of Richard Branson's highest-profile flops.

No, I'm not talking about the employee wellbeing company formerly known as Virgin Healthmiles.

First, Virgin Pulse was the UK company's ill-fated attempt to compete with Apple's iPod -- way back in 2003. Virgin Pulse was the brand name for a line of portable music devices. The last one, which was the size of a silver dollar, looked like this:

Here's Branson reflecting on his regrets about the misadventure years later:

"My management team says 2003 wasn’t exactly a vintage year for our group. Around the time Apple introduced its iPod personal music player in 2001, a couple of very bright people from Palm sold me on their own funky version of the MP3 player, and a range of accessories. Virgin’s management team strongly argued the financial analysis did not stack up and that we would have to sell a very high number of

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9.18.20
8 min. read

Apple eyes asthma, sleep apnea SaMDs? Amwell-Teladongo suit.

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It's a good one, too.
This digital health research is for paying Exits & Outcomes subscribers only. Subscribe now to read this article, get the weekly newsletter, and receive unrestricted access to past and future research from the Exits & Outcomes archives. Smash the link above or below to subscribe yourself -- or head over to our pricing page to subscribe your team or your whole company!

Issue 070

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Digital health research from Brian Dolan.

Welcome to E&O.

Last week I wrote about Click's maybe, someday $500M deal with Boehringer Ingelheim, Pear's full patent holdings, and more.

Here's what's happening this week:

  • Thanks to everyone who sent ideas, tips, and intros for the upcoming Virgin Pulse report I'm working on... keep them coming...
  • Amwell raised a bit more than it expected in its IPO Thursday: $742 million. Not sure this has been reported anywhere else yet: On its way out to the public markets, Amwell received one last attempted kick in the breech from Teladongo. Teladongo lobbed a patent infringement allegation that could impact 5 percent of Amwell's revenues: "On September 14, 2020, we received a letter from Teladoc Health, Inc. alleging that certain of our cart products and associated peripherals infringe upon their patents. While we
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9.11.20
6 min. read

32 Pear patents. Amwell $644M IPO.

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It's a good one, too.
This digital health research is for paying Exits & Outcomes subscribers only. Subscribe now to read this article, get the weekly newsletter, and receive unrestricted access to past and future research from the Exits & Outcomes archives. Smash the link above or below to subscribe yourself -- or head over to our pricing page to subscribe your team or your whole company!

Issue 069

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Digital health research from Brian Dolan.

Welcome to E&O.

Last week I wrote about how "breakthrough" is "too breakthrough" to secure CMS reimbursement under its latest proposed rule. Plus -- continuing on the "break" theme -- I posted the numbers related to Teladongo merger break-up fees. Finally, I dug into how some think about the regulated and unregulated components of digital therapeutics.

But, yea, that's in the past. Here's what's happening this week:

  • Following a subscriber's request, I've been researching Virgin Pulse for the next long-form report. I think it's a somewhat under-the-radar market leader in digital health, probably because it spent so many years as an employer-focused, step-counting rewards program. VP is owned by private equity firm Marlin Equity Partners these days, and it's really built itself up (and more deeply into
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9.04.20
8 min. read

New Teladongo merger details. Pear’s acquisitive study strategy.

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It's a good one, too.
This digital health research is for paying Exits & Outcomes subscribers only. Subscribe now to read this article, get the weekly newsletter, and receive unrestricted access to past and future research from the Exits & Outcomes archives. Smash the link above or below to subscribe yourself -- or head over to our pricing page to subscribe your team or your whole company!

Issue 068

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Digital health research from Brian Dolan.

Welcome to E&O.

Last week I wrote about Amwell's IPO filing and the possible longterm repercussions of Amazon's move into voice biomarkers via its first wearable device, Halo. Here's what's happening this week:

  • Teladoc-Livongo revealed more information about their multi-billion dollar merger in a lengthy government filing -- more on that below.
  • European tech site Sifted rounded up 15 digital health startups that have applied (or are in the process of applying) for reimbursement in Germany under that country's new digital health law.
  • One of mySugr's four founders, Frank Westermann, who was also the longtime CEO, announced he has left Roche, which acquired mySugr in 2017. He will continue investing and advising health startups post-mySugr.
  • Sunovion Pharmaceuticals is looking to hire a Senior Director
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8.28.20
8 min. read

Will Amazon ruin voice biomarkers? Amwell S-1 insights.

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This digital health research is for paying Exits & Outcomes subscribers only. Subscribe now to read this article, get the weekly newsletter, and receive unrestricted access to past and future research from the Exits & Outcomes archives. Smash the link above or below to subscribe yourself -- or head over to our pricing page to subscribe your team or your whole company!

Issue 067

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Digital health research from Brian Dolan.

Welcome to E&O.

Last week I published a 3,500 research report that dug into the past, present and future of Evidation Health. Here's what's happening this week:

  • Lots of great feedback on the Evidation report. Which other digital health companies should I dig into next?
  • Bayer invested $34.7 million in One Drop and committed to an additional $64 million "in development fees and potential commercial milestone payments." This is part of One Drop's expansion beyond diabetes and into TA's of interest to Bayer, including cardiology, oncology and women's health. Super curious what Bayer ends up acquiring One Drop for when the day comes...
  • This long-form writeup from CB Partners is a great read on digital health reimbursement. It is a bit fast-and-loose with a definition for digital therapeutics, but worth a read.
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14 min. read
8.21.20

The Evidation Health Report

In this article:

In this 3,500-word research report, E&O digs into the past, present, and future of Evidation Health. It offers up estimates for five years of annual revenues, eight years of user growth, business model details, strategy shifts, one legal spat, and what comes next.

Paying Subscribers Only

It's a good one, too.
This digital health research is for paying Exits & Outcomes subscribers only. Subscribe now to read this article, get the weekly newsletter, and receive unrestricted access to past and future research from the Exits & Outcomes archives. Smash the link above or below to subscribe yourself -- or head over to our pricing page to subscribe your team or your whole company!

The first time I heard about The Activity Exchange was soon after it launched in 2012. A MobiHealthNews reader asked me to investigate the company. He said they failed to count his exercise time correctly. The Activity Exchange (TAE) paid people for connecting various health apps or fitness devices and then sharing the data with them. Of course, if they thought you were trying to game the system, they wouldn't count it.

At the time, TAE apparently thought Paul's cycling data was suspicious because he rode a duplicate route twice-a-day. They only gave him credit for one of the rides. And he was pissed.

Turns out: He biked to work each day, and the duplicate ride was just his ride home.

Well, Paul, it's only taken me eight years, but I've spent the past few weeks digging into The Activity Exchange, now known as Evidation Health. And the company has come a long way since 2012.

Evidation is

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